At Teespring we have quarterly hackathons. We all throw suggestions into a melting-pot of ideas in the run-up to the event, with the most promising, most interesting, and most popular suggestions graduating to be hacked upon by a small team for a couple of days.

At the moment – and for the foreseeable future – the power balance of hiring negotiations favours the engineering candidates rather than with the hiring company. One consequence of this is that any attempt to hurry, strong-arm, or manipulate candidates will likely be ineffective, and could potentially backfire horribly.

This is how I became one such backfire.

I was recently asked:

what’s the worst project you ever worked on?

After a quick scan through my mental graveyard of half-finished, half-assed ideas too embarrassing for me to dignify with a link here, I settled upon my first job out of university.

I was always told to prize gifts that people had put time and effort into. Hoping my SO shared the same view, I decided to make her a little something for her birthday.

Being creatively barren, I attempted plagiarism. I remembered seeing this Kickstarter project ages ago. It’s based on an old parlour game: the idea is to conceal little messages inside a nice-looking block, to be popped out with a pencil when the recipient feels like it.

James Brady

I’m a software engineer by trade and an woodworker for fun. I like Ruby, Elixir, hard problems and learning new things with which solve them. I am fascinated by frisbees to the point of it getting a bit weird. I’m learning to speak Catalan. I like hiking in, up, and around vertiginous scenery. I play the trumpet poorly. That is all.

Oristà: a teeny tiny village in Catalunya